Best Physiotherapy Center in Dhaka

ByGlob magazine

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Physiotherapy service in Dhaka -Mohkhali DOHS

Shade Life Care Physiotherapy Center (SLC)

Address: House: 101, Park Road, Mohakhali DOHS, Dhaka.

Hotline: 01746956616, 01537518358

Consultatancy fee : 400 Tk

Therapy Charge: 1000 Tk

 

Meet our Physiotherapist:

 

Dr. Md.Tarikul Islam

Physiotherapist

Bachelor of Physiotherapy (B.PT)

National Inistitute of Traumatology & Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR)

Physiotherapy Practioner of Joint pain, Arhritis & Paralaysis.

 

Hafsa Nur

Medical Technologist (Physiotherapy)- IHT

BPT-( On Course)- IHT

 

Syeda Farhana (Anyana)

Medical Technologist (Physiotherapy)

BPT-( On Course)- IHT

 

What we Treat by Physiotherapy ??

Neck pain

-Back pain

– Knee pain

-Elbow pain.

-Wrist pain

– Hip joint OA

– Osteoarthritis

– Frozen Shoulder

– Carpal Tunnel syndrome

– Ankle Sprain

– Sciatica

– Muscle pain physiotherapy

– Joint pain physiotherapy

-Bells palsy physiotherapy

– Paralysis

– Cerebral Palsy  physiotherapy

– Parkinson disease physiotherapy

 

physiotherapy

Benefits of Physiotherapy :

Physical therapist services include evaluation and treatments provided by licensed physical therapists or physical therapist assistants. Physical therapy helps people:

  • Improve and restore movement and function.
  • Manage pain.
  • Reduce the symptoms of many chronic (long-term) conditions and diseases.
  • Recover from and prevent injury.

Here are some of the many benefits of physical therapy:

Maximize Your Movement

Physical therapists identify, diagnose, and treat movement problems. They help people maintain or restore as much function as possible. Physical function and movement are very important to:

  • Health, wellness, and fitness.
  • Managing pain.
  • Earning a living.
  • Independence.

Get the Recommended Amount of Physical Activity

Regular physical activity can benefit your physical, mental, and social health. It also helps to prevent or improve many chronic conditions, such as:

  • Heart disease.
  • Diabetes.
  • Obesity.
  • Depression.
  • Some cancers.

Physical therapists help people overcome barriers to physical activity.

Care That Meets Your Specific Needs

Physical therapists design treatment plans specific to each person’s needs, challenges, and goals. They work together with you to develop strategies and help you achieve your goals. Physical therapists and PTAs care for people of all ages and abilities.

Manage Pain and Avoid Opioids

While doctor-prescribed opioids are suitable for some cases, they only mask pain. Physical therapists help people manage pain without the risks of opioid use. Opioid risks include depression, substance use disorder, overdose, and withdrawal symptoms when stopping use.

To manage long-term pain, the CDC recommends safer options like physical therapy.

Avoid Surgery

Physical therapists help people manage pain and improve movement problems. Some pain and movement problems can become chronic and lead to surgery.

Physical therapy helps to reduce the symptoms of many chronic diseases and conditions. It also can keep many problems from getting worse. Physical therapists can help you avoid the need for, and the costs and risks of, surgery.

Research shows that physical therapy is as effective as surgery for some conditions, including:

Before you have surgery, try physical therapy.

In some cases, surgery cannot be avoided. Physical therapy helps people prepare for and recover after surgery.

Participate in Your Recovery

Physical therapists and PTAs empower people to take an active role in their care. They work with each other, and other health care providers, to make sure patients receive the best care.

Care Where You Need It

You can see physical therapists and PTAs almost anywhere, including:

  • Private practices.
  • Outpatient clinics.
  • Home, work, and school.
  • Sports and fitness facilities.
  • Nursing homes and rehab facilities.
  • Communities.

4 Ways How Physiotherapist Manage pain:

Physical therapy is among the safe and effective alternatives to opioids recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the management of most non-cancer related pain.

Whereas opioids only mask the sensation of pain, physical therapists treat pain through hands-on care, patient education, and prescribed movement.

Here’s how physical therapists manage pain by Physiotherapy :

1. Exercise.

A study following 20,000 people over 11 years found that those who exercised on a regular basis, experienced less pain. And among those who exercised more than 3 times per week, chronic widespread pain was 28% less common1. Physical therapists can prescribe exercise specific to your goals and needs.

2. Manual Therapy.

Research supports a hands-on approach to treating pain. From carpal tunnel syndrometo low back pain3, this type of care can effectively reduce your pain and improve your movement. Physical therapists may use manipulation, joint and soft tissue mobilizations, and dry needling, as well as other strategies in your care.

3. Education.

A large study conducted with military personnel4 demonstrated that those with back pain who received a 45 minute educational session about pain, were less likely to seek treatment than their peers who didn’t receive education about pain.

Physical therapists will talk with you to make sure they understand your pain history, and help set realistic expectations about your treatment.

4. Teamwork.

Recent studies have shown that developing a positive relationship with your physical therapist and being an active participant in your own recovery can impact your success. This is likely because physical therapists are able to directly work with you and assess how your pain responds to treatment.

Read more about Pain and Chronic Pain Syndromes.

The American Physical Therapy Association launched a national campaign to raise awareness about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for long-term pain management. Learn more at our #ChoosePT page.

References

1. Holth 
HS, Werpen HK, Zwart JA, Hagen K. Physical inactivity is associated with chronic musculoskeletal complaints 11 years later: results from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:159. Free Article.

2. Fernández-de-las Peñas C, Ortega-Santiago R, de la Llave-Rincón AI, et al. Manual physical therapy versus surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized parallel-group trial. J Pain. 2015;16(11):1087–1094. Article Summary in PubMed.

3. Delitto A, George SZ, Dillen LV, et al. Low back pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012;42(4):A1–A57. Free Article.

4. George SZ, Childs JD, Teyhen DS, et al. Brief psychosocial education, not core stabilization, reduced incidence of low back pain: results from the Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military cluster randomized trial. BMC Med. 2011;9:128. Free Article.

 

9 Things You Should Know about Pain:

Physical therapy is a safe treatment for people with acute or chronic pain. Physical therapists treat pain through movement, hands-on care, and patient education. You can contact a physical therapist directly for an evaluation.

Here are nine things physical therapists want you to know about pain.

1. Pain is output from the brain.

We used to believe that pain originated within the tissues of our body. We now understand that pain does not exist until the brain determines it does. The brain uses a virtual “road map” to direct an output of pain to tissues that it suspects may be in danger. This process is a means of communication between the brain and the tissues of the body, and serves as a defense against possible injury or disease.

2. The degree of injury does not always equal the degree of pain.

Research has demonstrated that we all experience pain in individual ways. While some of us can experience a major injury with little pain, others have a minor injury with a lot of pain (think of a paper cut).

3. Despite what diagnostic imaging (MRIs, x-rays, CT scans) shows us, the finding(s) may not be the cause of your pain.

A study on people 60 years or older who had no symptoms of low back pain found that:

  • 36% had a herniated disc.
  • 21% had spinal stenosis.
  • More than 90% had a degenerated or bulging disk, upon diagnostic imaging.

4. Psychological factors, such as depression and anxiety, can make your pain worse.

Pain can be influenced by many different factors, such as psychological conditions. A recent study in the Journal of Pain showed that psychological variables that existed before a total knee replacement were linked to a patient’s experience of long-term pain following the operation.

5. Your social environment may influence your perception of pain.

Many patients state their pain increases when they are at work or in a stressful situation. Pain messages can be sent when a person is in an environment or situation that the brain interprets as unsafe. It is a basic form of self-protection.

6. Understanding pain through education may reduce your need for care.

A large study looked at people in the military and found that those who were given a 45-minute educational session about pain sought care for low back pain less than their peers.

7. Our brains can be tricked into developing pain in prosthetic limbs.

Studies have shown that our brains can be tricked. They can develop a “referred” feeling in a limb that has been amputated, and cause “pain” that seems to come from a prosthetic limb – or the “phantom” limb. The feeling is generated by the association of the brain’s perception of what the body is from birth (whole and complete) and what it currently is (after amputation).

8. The ability to determine left from right may be altered when you experience pain.

Networks within the brain that help you determine left from right can be affected when you have severe pain. If you have pain, and have noticed your sense of direction is a bit off, it may be because the “roadmap” in the brain that details a path to each part of the body may be a bit “smudged.” (This is a term we use to describe a part of the brain’s virtual roadmap that isn’t clear. Imagine spilling ink onto paper roadmap and then trying to use that map to get to your destination.)

9. There is no way to know whether you have a high tolerance for pain or not. Science has yet to determine whether we all experience pain in the same way.

While some people claim to have a “high tolerance” for pain, there is no accurate way to measure or compare pain tolerance among people. While some tools exist to measure how much force you can resist before experiencing pain, it can’t be determined what your pain “feels like.”

If you have pain that limits your movement or keeps you from taking part in work, daily living, and other activities, a physical therapist can help. To find a physical therapist in your area, visit a Physiotherapist.

5 Tips To manage Chronic Pain:

1. Knowledge is power

There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that understanding how pain works is a key strategy in managing it. Simply knowing the basics of how our brain and nerves work and their role in pain, can decrease your chance of developing chronic symptoms. Learn more.

2. Keep moving (gradually and steadily)

Living an active, healthy lifestyle not only improves our general well-being and health, but can also reduce our chances of developing chronic pain. Our body was built to move, and we need to understand that not all aches or soreness is cause for concern. Learn more.

3. Spend time with a physical therapist

If you experience an injury, or develop the onset of pain, seeing a physical therapist early on can help address and manage your symptoms. Physical therapists use the latest evidence to design treatment plans for each person’s individual needs, challenges, and goals to improve mobility, manage pain and other chronic conditions, recover from injury, and prevent future injury and chronic disease. Accessing care early by a physical therapist reduces your chances of developing chronic symptoms. Learn more.

4. Focus less on the image

While most of us want a diagnostic image (ie, x-ray, MRI) to tell us “why we hurt,” images actually give us little information about what’s causing pain. A study performed on individuals aged 60 years or older, who had no symptoms of low back pain, found that more than 90% had a degenerated or bulging disc, 36% had a herniated disc, and 21% had spinal stenosis. What shows up on an image may or may not be related to your symptoms. Once imaging has cleared you of a serious condition, your physical therapist will help optimize your quality of life with a combination of prescribed exercise, hands-on care, and education.

5. Addressing depression and anxiety helps

Your chances of developing chronic pain may be higher if you also are experiencing depression and anxiety. A recent study in the Journal of Pain showed that depression, as well as some of our thoughts about pain prior to total knee replacement, was related to long-term pain following the procedure. Talk to your medical provider about any mental health concerns during your treatment, following an injury or surgery.

Physical therapists are movement experts who improve quality of life through hands-on care, patient education, and prescribed movement. You can contact a physical therapist directly for an evaluation.

Resources

Louw A, Farrell K, Landers M, et al. The effect of manual therapy and neuroplasticity education on chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. J Man Manip Ther. 2017;25(5):227–234. Article Summary in PubMed.

Physiotherapy Management of Temperomendibular joint (TMJ) Disorders

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